Passing The Architect Registration Exam in 7 Months

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Who is Trevor Nye?

Trevor is one interesting dude.

He lives in New York, graduated from NJIT in 2014, works for Gensler, and became a Licensed Architect in September 2016.

He and I became friends in the Facebook ARE Group while he was studying for his exams. Trevor completed all seven 4.0 exams within 7 months. And unlike the few others that complete the ARE in record time, he chronicled each exam experience with how much he studied, which books he reviewed, and generally how everything went.

Being the moderator of the Facebook Group, I must admit that Trevor’s posts made me nervous at first. But as I read each one, I realized he had a lot to say and was keenly aware of the NCARB confidentiality agreement. He never stepped over that line by disclosing any of the information he saw on an exam.

What I appreciate most about Trevor is his attitude. From reading his posts and gauging how he interacts with people in the Facebook group, I could tell that this guy approached taking the ARE with enthusiasm, willingness to get the work done and wanting to help others. Even now that he’s completely finished, Trevor continues to answer questions and be actively engaged in the ARE Facebook group.

After Trevor successfully passed his last exam, I asked him if he’d be interested in sharing his ARE posts on Young Architect. I believe that there are a lot of people who can learn from him, even if they aren’t taking ARE 4.0—and are on a less aggressive schedule. Trevor was excited about this prospect and sent me all the information, which I’ve share below.

I don’t always agree with Trevor 100% of the time, and that’s OK ,its also a good thing. For the sake of everyone studying for the ARE, I think the more opinions, experiences and insights the better.  Each of us has own unique experience when taking these exams. There’s a lot we can all learn from each other. We’re all unique human beings with different skills, beliefs, upbringings, and backgrounds.

I also truly believe that the most paralyzing thing an ARE Candidate can do is look at someone else’s process and make assumptions about these exams—before they’ve gotten knee deep in doing this work.

The Trevor Nye Posts

Below is an article Trevor wrote for Young Architect. He tells his story and shares some tips for getting through the exam. After that, his recaps for each of the 7 ARE 4.0 exams follow.

Enjoy,

Michael Riscica


My ARE-a-thon: A Race to Pass All 7 AREs in 7 Months Before I Got Married

My battle with the AREs began on September 26, 2015 when I proposed to the love of my life and set in motion a juggernaut of a countdown. Having worked in an architectural design firm on and off since 2011, I had heard from my mentors and superiors repeatedly, “Take the licensing exams before you get married and have kids.” Some of these coworkers were inspirations and some were warning signs…I knew for sure I didn’t want to be a 40 year old “architectural intern” more knowledgeable and experienced than the majority of my peers but somehow undeserving of the mantle “Architect”.

It took me several weeks of researching and planning and acquiring all of the study material and charting the order of exams, but finally I was ready to go. I listed New York as my jurisdiction despite being a resident of New Jersey. While this was massively helpful for me in that I was able to take my exams currently with IDP/AXP hours, I justified it by the projects on which I was working at the time in NYC (Had I listed NJ as my jurisdiction, I would not have been allowed to start taking the AREs until January 2017 (READ THE FINE PRINT. DO YOUR RESEARCH)). And then I sat on it all from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Eve (I don’t recommend taking exams during this time period just because of the chaos of the holiday season). Finally, as the calendar rolled forward once more, I resolved and vowed to take at least one of the exams before the wedding which we book for 09/03. Depending on how that went, I would take as many as I could.

I scheduled my first exam, CDS, for the beginning of February and studied all through January. I probably overstudied for fear of failing the first exam. Psychologically, I really needed a PASS on Test 1 just to give me motivation to keep slaying tests. Before I received the first score report for CDS, I scheduled PPP in order to not let possible discouragement prevent me from taking more tests. I continued this scheduling technique through all 7 exams.

Once I completed the Triad (CDS, PPP, SPD) I realized that it was in the realm of possibility that I could pass all 7 exams before the wedding on 09/03. I took a week to study for SD to give myself more dedicated time to the most difficult exams (in my opinion) – SS, BDCS, and BS.

I took a full month to study SS. At this point, I was checking my score reports at 4 AM every day after the exam in nervous anticipation… this habit also continued to Test 7. BDCS was straight forward (PRACTICE THE VIGNETTES). To this day I honestly have no clue how I passed BS. I did not give myself enough time to study and I was not prepared. Regardless, I somehow passed it and got to enjoy the 3 weeks leading up to my wedding (Just kidding! It was the most hectic time of my life and I somehow ended up building 15 wood farm tables!)

To carry on the tradition of those who traveled down this dark, arduous, lonely trail before me, I decided to do a “Post-Test Brain Dump” for all my tests to recap my experience and the materials I studied. I also compiled a list of tips for taking the AREs below:

 

Tips on taking the AREs:

  • Don’t let it scare you. It’s a test. It is designed to be difficult and to test your knowledge…but it is designed to be passed. I’ve seen too many people, presumably terrified by others’ horror stories, become too scared or complacent to take the exam. It took me quite a while to finally bite the bullet and schedule my first exam. At the end of the day, as someone working in the architectural profession you have nothing to lose and everything to gain by taking the exams. So what if you fail? Sure, you lost a few hundred bucks, but you haven’t lost what knowledge you have gained and you got a good look at what that particular exam is going to look like.
  • Schedule your next exam before you get the results from an exam you just took. If you failed, the feeling is often times enough to discourage or delay one from continuing on with the ARE journey. Keep the ball rolling…
  • If you did fail an exam, SCHEDULE IT IMMEDIATELY AFTER GETTING YOUR RESULTS FOR THE CLOSEST POSSIBLE TESTING DAY. There is no sense in putting a failed exam off. You have to think of the body of knowledge you have covered as vessel that is partially full and has a slow, continuous leak (time’s effect on memory). The faster you can reschedule, the less content you will lose and the faster you can fortify and build upon what you already have studied.
  • After you take and pass an exam come up with a rough schedule for taking all of the tests. Everyone has a different amount of free time, responsibilities, ability to process, internalize, and memorize information, but the faster you are able to test, the better. Don’t think of these tests as separate entities. Content from one bleeds into another. Think about the leaky vessel metaphor again. The more knowledge you have from other exam areas the wider your net will be cast and the more likely you will be to cover information pertinent to the exam.
  • As it is a test, recognize that your ability as a test taker might just be as important as your architectural knowledge. We’ve all taken thousands of tests in our lives, but when looking at the ARE, you have to realize that this is a specific animal that is crafted in a predictable way.
    • It is a multiple choice exam. The answer to all the questions are right there in front of you
    • Practice the vignettes! There is no ways around this one. The software is garbage that was developed 20 years ago and hasn’t been updated. While it is meant to level the playing field, is simply a handicap for everyone. If you spend enough time, and find a technique for each vignette, you won’t have a problem. Don’t let it trip you up.
    • Practice, Practice, Practice – I found the Ballast and Kaplan practice exam to be the most useful. They do a great job of explaining questions and solutions. They also hold closely to the verbiage and semantics used on the AREs, which is incredibly important.
    • Process of elimination – Getting down to 2 answers is critical. Even if you get down to 2 answers and go with your gut on every question you have a good shot at passing
    • Buzzwords – I can’t overstate how important it is to pick out the most important words in the question. I’d say that I made educated guesses on 30-40% of questions based just on process of elimination and stripping the questions down to buzzwords and applying whatever knowledge I had. It’s impossible to cover every topic, so of course you’re going to get WTF questions.
    • Qualifiers Always, Not, Never, Often – These words coupled with Buzzwords are essential. Gotta identify these to get to the heart of the question.
  • Set a deadline. Set a schedule. The abstract concept of taking the exam becomes a stark reality when you put a few hundred bucks on the line. Find a time and book it.
  • Concepts > Facts ….but you still need to know the facts…It is critical that you understand the concepts. On the exam, this will help you infer the information to make an educated guess…and most of your answers will be educated guesses. Very rarely during the course of test taking did I come across a question that I was 100% confident in answering. Every answer should be weighed and calculated. Eliminate the wrong answers. Weigh the remaining options. Make a guess before you move to the next question. If you don’t feel confident or you feel like if you spend more time, you will come up with the right answer, flag it for later. But make sure you are able to get through all of the questions. That is more important than spending 5 minutes on a question to get the right answer only to run out of time and miss the last 10 questions some of which may be easy questions.
  • Understand the content that will be on the exam and study accordingly. On each ARE test study guide is a breakdown of the percentage of the questions devoted to each category. This is your chart. This is your map. If category A will comprise 35% of the exam questions and category B only 5% of the questions, then 35% of your time should be dedicated to category A. Example: I never spent more than 30 minutes studying architecture history. Will these questions show up on the exam? Sure. But to cover all architectural history is truly a Herculean effort. These are questions that are difficult or impossible to infer from concepts.
  • Take advantage of forums and those who have taken the test before you. Sure, you’re smart…but you’re not as smart as the collective knowledge of the thousands of architects that have passed the test. (AREndurance – Jenny’s Notes, Caroline’s Notes, Young Architect, Candy Chan, ARE Coach, Google+ ARE Community, Facebook NCARB – Architecture Registration Exam. Google… Youtube…).
  • Take ARE 4.0. I understand the appeal of wanting to take 5 tests rather than 7….however, I think there’s statistical evidence to show the huge pass rate drop after each test change. I attribute this to the lack of focused study material. “Better the devil that you know than the devil that you don’t.” …Translation: Sure, it sucks…but at least you know what to expect.

ARE Brain Dumps

Below are Trevor’s posts for each exam. I created links jumping to each exam to help facilitate moving through each exams post.
Construction Documents and Services
Programming, Planning and Practice
Site Planning and Design
Schematic Design 
Structural Systems
Building Design and Construction Systems
Building Systems

Construction Documents and Services

Long time follower, first time poster..

Just took and passed my first exam: CD&S.

Study timeline: 5 weeks / 4 hours per day

Study materials:

Vignette:

  • Solved NCARB practice exam twice to familiarize myself with the interface
  • YouTube walk through tutorials
  • Dorf solutions

Thoughts: It was my first time testing, so I didn’t really know what to expect.  Being new to Prometric, I was nervous about the process, but once I sat down all of that went away. On MC I powered through all 100 in the first hour and flagged about half of the questions that I used the remaining time to focus on. I felt super confident on the vignette but there were definitely curveball, wtf questions on which I simply had to guess. Walking out, I felt pretty good but thought there was possibility that I could have failed which I then convinced myself I had. I maintained this mindset until I finally saw the “pass”. It being my first test, I didn’t want to get my hopes up only to be dashed and then discouraged to not take more exams soon thereafter.

Note: I bought and read Gang Chen’s mock exam. I don’t recommend it. It seems poorly edited. The font is massive I think to make up for the lack of content. Probably the worst part is the questions and answers though. There is a particular verbiage used in NCARB, ballast, and Kaplan material that I find lacking in this book. Not only this, it seems many answers (especially the vignette) are speculative. That said, when you grade yourself and find that you failed due to the lack of clarity in questions and answers it can be discouraging. Having a positive attitude and confidence going into the exam is key.

***There’s no substitute for the reading and studying the actual contract docs. All the study material is great, but the AIA documents are the meat of this exam.

Programming, Planning and Practice

Second exam taken, second exam passed..

Test: PPP

Study timeline: 4 weeks / 4 hours per day (Caveat: I took this exam less than 1 month after CD&S which was probably my saving grace. I’d say 15% of the questions could have easily been on CD&S).

Study materials:

Vignette:

  • Brudgers method (long winded…but very good step by step strategy)
  • solved NCARB practice vignette once to familiarize myself with the interface
  • NCARB youtube video
  • Dorf solutions

Thoughts: Following CD&S I wanted to take PPP as soon as possible while the information was still fresh. My total study time was actually 3 weeks and one solid weekend of studying due to work deadlines. I’m usually so exhausted from the week that I’m unproductive in studying on the weekend even though I have so much more time. I highly recommend finding a place to study with NO distractions. Different strokes for different folks but if I study at home there are a million distractions and if I study at my work desk…well let’s face it work never ends. Find a library, find a focus room, find a broom closet and lock yourself in there for 3 hours every night with some books and you’ll be good to go.

In taking the exam, I found the questions to be much harder than CD&S. I think the main reason for this is the breadth of the material and the nuanced subtleties of the information they are trying to extract. Not only will some questions be about something you’ve never heard of, but they will also be specific questions about something you’ve never heard of. I reasoned it down to 2 options on those questions, went with my gut and flagged it for later. I got through all 85 questions in 1:10 and I spent 30 minutes going through the flagged questions (around 25 questions). The last 20 minutes, I flipped through all the questions but I don’t think I changed any answers (trust the gut!!!).

The vignette was a total breeze. It was very similar to the practice problem and the Brudgers method worked like a charm. I finished in less than 30 minutes and had time to triple check it.

Leaving the exam, I felt pretty confident…more confident than when I left the CD&S exam…which subsequently terrified me for the next week until I got the result. I scheduled SPD before I got the results of PPP to force myself onward if I got the fail. Taking SPD in 3 weeks.

Note: Because of the breadth of the material, I would suggest not spending a lot of time on material specific books like Problem Seeking or Creating Defensible Space. They are interesting, but at the end of the day you really only need to know 3-5 concepts from the material so I would suggest getting through it as quickly as possible and focusing on the general broad base of knowledge. In regards to history…I didn’t even bother and I don’t think there is a point to studying history apart from other materials. It is touched upon in ballast and Kaplan and Jenny’s notes and Caroline’s notes. Going beyond that is strategically unwise given the amount of history specific questions (roughly 2-4). The chances of you studying the specific building/project are slim. Stick to architects and movements if you do..

I think the single most valuable piece of study material for MC were the NALSA flash cards. They’re a great study tool. Take them with you on the train, to lunch, they’re your new best friends…

Ballast, Jenny’s notes and Caroline’s notes all tied for second.

I didn’t even bother with Gang Chen. I had the book but I was really disappointed with his stuff after CD&S. So for all I know it could be great or terrible…I just know I don’t like his style. But nothing makes me happier than to hear that he’s running for mayor in the great city of Irvine, California. Between his architectural, political, and singing career…he is truly a force to be reckoned with.

On to SPD!

Site Planning and Design

Third test taken, third test passed.

Test passed: SPD

Previous tests in order: CD&S, PPP

Study timeline: 3 weeks

Study material:

Vignette:

Thoughts: I was confident I was going to fail this one. I had given myself 4.5 weeks to study all the material. Due to work and deadlines, my study time was cut down to 2 weeks with a week to practice the software and solving the vignettes. Again, my saving grace was that I took CDS and PPP before this exam so in studying I was encouraged in finding much of the information overlapping what I had studied before so it was more of a reinforcing exercise than learning new concepts. In studying, I did not have time to go through practice problems, but I do suggest doing it if you have the time. There were some tricky MC questions but nothing as out of the blue as PPP. I was able to finish all questions in an hour with 20 questions marked. I got through these and then flipped through all the questions quickly to make sure I didn’t miss anything glaring. I felt pretty comfortable at the end of MC. I was nervous going into the vignettes because I had seen a wide range in practice problems, but I was fortunate to get two vignettes very similar to NCARBs practice problems. I highly recommend practicing the vignettes every night for a week. Come up with a step by step game plan for how you are going to solve it. Jenny’s notes has some great commentary on this. I found that making the matrix for Site Design to be very useful. I was able to get through Site Grading in 30 minutes and finished the Site Design in an hour so I had 30 minutes to double and triple check both.

Leaving the testing center, I felt confident. I think getting a few tests under your belt is huge for confidence. Being rattled going into the testing center is never a good thing.

Schematic Design 

Fourth test taken, fourth test passed.

Test passed: SD

Previous tests in order:

  • CD&S (02/05/16)
  • PPP (03/18/16)
  • SPD (04/15/16)
  • SD (05/09/16)

Study timeline: 1 week / 5 hours per day

Vignette study material:

  • NCARB study guide and videos (YouTube)
  • Black spectacles video (YouTube)
  • Jenny’s notes
  • various ARE Coach guides
  • ARE 4.0 community (Google+) this was probably the most valuable resource I found

Practiced each vignette 3 times each (didn’t do the alternate vignettes)

Thoughts:

Faced with taking the exam in 1 week or 3 1/2 weeks I chose 1 week and it paid off, but I did crunch super hard for this one. I knew that it was simply knowing the concepts, knowing how to use the program, and knowing what not to do. I felt pretty decent going into the exam. The key for this test is to have a clear, concise game plan going into it. By and large, you know what you’re going to get, you don’t have to worry about MC, so this is a great opportunity to focus on two exercises and nail them. I’d suggest using a matrix for both vignettes. Even if you don’t use it, filling it out help you digest and  process the program better than flipping back and forth.

I finished the first vignette in 30 minutes. Super easy. In practicing the software I did spend more time on this because of the 1 hour time restraint…there is little room for big mistakes and if you do find one further than 30 minutes in, you’ll be SOL. Use Jenny’s method and make a matrix. Figure out which rooms need Windows and which need direct access and that gives you your basic plan. I used the rest of the time to set up a matrix for vignette 2: building layout. Even though I didn’t know the exact rooms, areas, etc. I set up as much as I could to give myself time later rather than twiddling my thumbs for 30 minutes. The building layout was actually more difficult than I anticipated. My advice is…don’t worry about it being pretty…just make it work. Once your double height space is set don’t play with it too much, you may forget to make the shift on the other floor. Make sure the 2nd floor walls line up or are inside of the 1st floor plan profile. I’m attaching the PDF guides that I used to study. They explain it much better than I am right now. Leaving the exam, I felt pretty confident. It took NCARB twice as long to get back to me so I did get a little nervous. Very glad to be over the hump and into the home stretch. Hoping to finish the remaining 3 exams before September but that may be wishful thinking.

Next up, SS.

Structural Systems

Fifth test taken, fifth test passed.

Test passed: SS

Previous tests in order:

  • CD&S (02/05/16)
  • PPP (03/18/16)
  • SPD (04/15/16)
  • SD (05/09/16)
  • SS (06/15/16)

Study timeline:  3 weeks / 5 hours per day (I packed 3 weekends with studying)

Study material I used:

Study Material I didn’t study because of time restraints:

Vignette study material:

Re: Study Materials:

The fact that I passed this exam is nothing short of an act of God. 4 days out I was one click away from rescheduling as I had never felt so unprepared for an exam and was certain I would fail it. I said screw it and took the exam. If nothing else, I was going to get a good look at the exam and know what to study for the next time around.

In studying, I focused on solidifying my conceptual understanding of the material and work myself toward the specifics (equations) as these were the most unfamiliar to me and I wanted them to be the freshest in my memory. This strategy paid off as I found that the majority of the questions on the exam were conceptual in nature.

Along with strategizing studying conceptual to specifics, I think it is essential to understand the content and even the history of the exam. On the NCARB study guide it breaks down what percentage of content you will see on the exam – 40% General Structures, 30% Seismic Forces, 15% Wind Forces, 15% Lateral Forces General. As you are studying you NEED to recognize this breakdown and allocate your time accordingly – there is too much content on this exam to dawdle on items you understand. In previous iterations of the ARE, General Structures and Lateral Forces used to be two separate exams. Again, this is crucial to how you use your time. If 60% of the exam is now lateral forces, than that is where you should be spending the majority of your time.

Why Buildings Fall Down/Why Buildings Stand Up provided good conceptual background, although in retrospect, I feel that I spent too much time here.

Building Design and Construction Systems

Sixth test taken, sixth test passed.

Previous tests in order:

  • CD&S (02/05/16)
  • PPP (03/18/16)
  • SPD (04/15/16)
  • SD (05/09/16)
  • SS (06/15/16)
  • BDCS (07/11/16)

Study timeline:  3 weeks / 5 hours per day (I packed 3 weekends with studying)

Study material I used:

Study Material I didn’t study because of time restraints:

Vignette study material:

Thoughts:

I took a week off after SS to rest and regroup before diving into BDCS. I started off by going through all of the NALSA Materials & Methods flash cards. I read through Kaplan and took all the quizzes reviewing all the answers and focusing time on my weak areas. I don’t feel like Kaplan is ever enough for any test, let alone one as expansive as BDCS which, to me, seems like a test on A LOT of very specific information. So instead of taking practice tests I just tried to get through as much material as possible. I skimmed Jenny’s notes, Ballast, and Fundamentals of Building Construction. I went through NALSA a second time and took out all of the cards with which I was familiar. I spent the remainder of my study time going over these.

I would also recommend spending 10-15 hours reviewing the vignettes: understanding what they are asking for, practicing the software, and managing time. With three vignettes to juggle it’s nice if you nail one and have extra time for another, but if you are uncomfortable with 2 or 3 of the vignettes you might really be battling the clock.

Test Day:

I was able to get my usual 7:30 slot. I’m not a morning person, but starting a test fresh with nothing else on your mind is the way to go in my opinion. I got through MC quickly with 20 minutes to review my marked questions.

The vignettes were tough just because there were three of them. The ramp was easy, the stair was also easy. Just because I prepared twice as much for it. It’s the roof vignette that I think is tricky just because there are several solutions but some are definitely better than others. It’s the type of vignette that you really need to make sure at the beginning that you are making the right choices, because if you’re not, there’s no easy fix and it’s probably best to just start over. I found Dorf and Jenny’s notes super helpful for preparing for the vignettes.

I left the test feeling ok…not great. I was stoked to get the pass though. Only one more to go 7/7.

I took and passed BS two weeks after I took BDCS. I’ll write up a list of my study materials for BS soon.

 

Building Systems

Seventh and last test taken, seventh and last test passed

Previous tests in order:

  • CD&S (02/05/16)
  • PPP (03/18/16)
  • SPD (04/15/16)
  • SD (05/09/16)
  • SS (06/15/16)
  • BDCS (07/11/16)
  • BS (07/29/16)

Study timeline:  2 weeks / 5 hours per day (2 weekends packed with studying)

Study material I used:

Study Material I didn’t study because of time restraints:

Vignette study material:

  • Lug-Nug FAQ on ARE Coach
  • NCARB study guide and videos (YouTube)
  • Jenny’s notes
  • ARE 4.0 community (Google+) posts and discussions on their forum
  • Practiced the Vignette once. Did not feel very comfortable with rules of thumbs regarding lighting and HVAC

Thoughts:

I’ll start by saying that I didn’t feel comfortable with 2 weeks of study time and I don’t recommend it if you want to be confident going into the exam. I felt like I skimmed everything and didn’t get a good grasp of anything. Luckily I was able to touch all of the topics just not in depth which I guess is the theme of the AREs: concepts > specific information.

Test Day:

I left the test feeling the worst of all the tests. I felt terrible going into the exam and taking it in the afternoon was a change for me. It may seem like an inconsequential detail, but if you are able to come up with a routine and iron out the details, those are things that won’t be requiring you time and energy leading up to and during the exam. IF YOU FIND SOMETHING THAT WORKS FOR YOU, DON’T CHANGE IT. Some people think clearer in the afternoon. I personally feel much fresher in the morning despite not being a morning person. Because I tested in the afternoon, I didn’t feel as fresh as my normal 7:30 test. I felt drained going in. I was able to get through all of the questions once flagging about 35-40%, however, of the questions that I flagged, I was only able to get through about half of them. Usually I am able to get through all of the flagged questions and then flip through the questions one last time…so I was kind of freaking out.

For the vignette, I definitely did not practice the software enough and was being way too nitpicky with light placement. I don’t believe there is a perfect solution for this problem and based on my solution, I know that an imperfect solution will pass, so don’t fret on the exam…do your best and make sure you FINISH IT. Like the MC I literally was scrambling with seconds left on the vignette. And like the MC, this was a new scenario for me. Usually I have ample time to double and triple check my solution, but for some reason I was working through it slower than usual and didn’t have the practice under my belt that I needed. I literally placed the last piece of flex duct with 0:02 left.

Needless to say…I left feeling pretty dejected. But I consoled myself in that I had done everything I could have with the time I allotted myself, and the time I allotted myself was not adjustable. I had a wedding coming up at the beginning of September, a family reunion the first week of August and I didn’t want to be studying over vacation so that’s why I gave myself two weeks. I also didn’t want to be studying in the weeks leading up to the wedding.

The wedding is actually what started off my ARE-a-thon to begin with. I got engaged in September 2015 and as soon as we had a venue booked, all of the warnings my older coworkers and mentors gave me came flooding back in…”Take the tests before you get married and have kids!!”. I scheduled the first one not knowing what to expect and just studied my hardest hoping to get one done before the wedding. When I got the PASS, it felt so good that I decided to go for the triple crown with PPP and SPD in addition to CDS which I had passed. It was only after I passed those three that it hit me that passing all of the exams before the wedding was feasible if I stuck to a rigorous schedule and stayed disciplined. I sacrificed 95%of my social life from January to July and definitely put some strain on myself as well as my relationships with family, friends and fiancée. Doubtless, I had their unwavering support for which I am eternally grateful as I wouldn’t have been able to pass any of these without their words of encouragement and willingness to put up with an irritable me.

I got my result on the last day of the family reunion and was pretty stoked to be able to share the news with family. It took a while to sink in…idk that it really has yet actually. I just finished my IDP hours but I still have to fulfill my 3 post grad years for the NY State Board. So I guess until then it’s just a waiting game.

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About the author

Michael Riscica

Michael Riscica is a Licensed Architect who lives in beautiful Portland, Oregon, with his Labrador Retriever. He is passionate about helping Young Architects change the world. In his free time, Michael likes to take very long bicycle rides across America. Learn more about him here and connect with him on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Linked In. Also check out his new project Young Architect Gear, designing architecturally themed gifts and products.

Erin Nye - November 14, 2016

Trevor is one interesting dude. He’s also an amazing husband… so proud of him.

Michael, thanks for writing this article and for your work helping young architects achieve their goals.

    Michael Riscica - November 14, 2016

    My pleasure. You guys are both Awesome! Keep up the good work!

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