Young Architect https://youngarchitect.com Helping The Future of The Architecture Profession Succeed! Fri, 20 Nov 2020 19:18:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://youngarchitect.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/cropped-ya-fav-black-32x32.png Young Architect https://youngarchitect.com 32 32 180165536 Design a Balanced Life with Feyi Quadri https://youngarchitect.com/design-a-balanced-life-with-feyi-quadri/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=design-a-balanced-life-with-feyi-quadri Fri, 20 Nov 2020 19:18:36 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=32018 Feyi

Feyi’s story will sound familiar to many architects and people who know architects. She remembers as a small child taking all of the blocks in the classroom so that she could build the tallest towers, and she enjoyed building bridges with Legos.

However, she didn’t really start thinking in terms of an architecture career until high school. She says that she first met a licensed architect in 10th grade. She attended a magnet school where she took a drafting class that she loved, then she attended pre-college courses. After graduating from high school, she enrolled in Carnegie Mellon’s B.Arch program. 

Feyi says that it took her some time after graduation to transition to the working world, and she found her first job a few months after graduation. During the COVID pandemic, Feyi has been exploring her creative side, making YouTube videos and establishing a social media brand. She’s also been working and studying for her architecture exams. Listen in to hear what Feyi has to say about balancing the different aspects of her life, being a keynote speaker for the Young Architect Winter Series, and indulging her creative instincts. 

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  •  What inspired Feyi to go into architecture
  • What happened after architecture school
  • The types of projects Feyi has been working on
  • Feyi’s online brand
  • The kind of content Feyi shares on her YouTube channel
  • The content that Feyi has coming out soon
  • The software that Feyi is using to make her videos
  • What Feyi plans to talk about at the Young Architect Winter Series
  • Feyi’s experience of studying for the exams
  • How to balance work, studying, and other projects
  • How to stir up creativity
  • Feyi’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Feyi knows now that she didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Feyi
  • Feyi’s favorite resource, product, or gadget
  • Feyi’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Feyi online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. Doing little things can help you build up to the big things
  2. Discover your passion outside of architecture
  3. Don’t be so hard on yourself

Feyi’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“My advice would be find something outside of architecture that keeps you going.”

Favorite Quotes

“To not be so hard on yourself for the decisions you make.”  –Feyi on what she knows today that she didn’t know back then

“When I first graduated, a book that was gifted to me was called The Defining Decade.”  –Feyi on the book that changed everything

“My sketchbook.” –Feyi on her favorite resource or gadget

“The top three method.” –Feyi on her best timesaving trick

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Feyi on YouTube
Feyi on Instagram
Feyi on Twitter
Feyi on Facebook

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32018
Run to the Challenge with Julia Jack https://youngarchitect.com/run-to-the-challenge-with-julia-jack/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=run-to-the-challenge-with-julia-jack Wed, 18 Nov 2020 19:32:56 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=32014 Julia Jack

Julia Jack remembers that when she was a child, she liked to make things. She even recalls building a cell phone out of wood. But as she grew into her teen years, architecture wasn’t on her mind – she wanted to become a ballet dancer.

However, Julia says, she didn’t have the physique needed to make it as a professional dancer. She had to find something else that she was interested in to study and pursue as a career. This took some time because she needed to let go of her dream of dancing. Eventually, due to her interest in both art and math, she settled on architecture.

Julia attended architecture school, but afterward, what she really wanted to be was a stay-at-home mother. She worked for a while, then took time off to stay home with her kids, then returned to work. Over the course of her professional life, she’s worked in a number of different industries related to her field – interior design, architecture, project management, and even construction employment. 

In today’s episode, Julia discusses her varied career and the types of knowledge she’s gained from it. She discusses her role as a product manager and how she likes working on the owner’s rep side of things. She also talks about her upcoming keynote speech for the Young Architects Winter Series and her experience with the ARE boot camp. 

What You’ll Hear on This Episode   

  • What inspired Julia to go into architecture
  • Julia’s professional trajectory
  • The types of work Julia has done
  • The importance of a good team
  • Julia’s experience with the architect exam
  • How the boot camp helped Julia
  • Julia’s insights about building a team and working collaboratively
  • Julia’s role as a project manager
  • How Julia likes working on the owner’s rep side of things
  • What Julia will be talking about in her speech for the Young Architects Winter Series
  • The importance of understanding why you’re doing things
  • Julia’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Julia knows now that she didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Julia
  • Julia’s favorite resource, product, or gadget
  • Where listeners can find Julia online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. There are no stupid questions
  2. Do the things you have to do to get to what you want to do
  3. Who you are is important

Julia Jack’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“One, I would say ask a lot of questions. Never think that there’s any stupid questions. And maybe your mom told you that, or your teacher told you that. And maybe some people told you don’t ask so many questions. But ask them anyway. Because even when you get experience, I still ask questions. I ask questions that I may know because you might have a different perspective on the same thing that I think I know and maybe I don’t know it as much. Or maybe there’s a different perspective. So never stop asking questions, no matter how much experience you get. And, other people like to know that you care about what they’re thinking and about what they know. So that also could go into being a more… to lead by allowing.”

Favorite Quotes

“Myself.”  –Julia Jack on what she knows today that she didn’t know back then

“I would say it is The Magic by Rhonda Byrne.”  –Julia Jack on the book that changed everything

“There’s nothing you can’t figure out how to do on YouTube.” –Julia Jack on her favorite resource or gadget

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

JuliaSuJack@yahoo.com

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32014
Giving Back with Yoselim Bravo https://youngarchitect.com/giving-back-with-yoselim-bravo/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=giving-back-with-yoselim-bravo Fri, 13 Nov 2020 18:16:03 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=32011 Yoselim Bravo

Yoselim Bravo says that she wasn’t a normal kid. But that’s OK. She also thinks that not being a normal kid was what made her an architect. She can remember building with her brother’s Lego set and drawing floorplans with her father before she was old enough to really know what a floor plan was. 

Yoselim grew up in Peru. She enjoyed history and especially learning about historic buildings, and she considered pursuing studies in archeology after high school. Her family was less certain about that career path, and it was Yoselim’s mother who suggested that she consider a career in architecture instead. After checking out what an architecture degree entailed at her college, Yoselim agreed that this was the path for her. 

In today’s interview, Yoselim talks about her experiences in architecture school in Peru, and about moving to the United States and taking classes in English for the first time. She discusses her journey as a working architect and her experiences with the architect exams and boot camp.

Yoselim also talks about her volunteer work and why that’s important to her. In fact, she’s scheduled to talk about it at the Young Architect Winter Series. Listen in to learn more about Yoselim and her journey as an architect.

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  • What inspired Yoselim to go into architecture
  • Yoselim’s architecture school experience
  • Yoselim’s thesis project
  • What happened for Yoselim once school was over
  • What happened when Yoselim started working
  • Yoselim’s first time taking classes in English in South Florida
  • Yoselim’s story about the architect exams
  • How Yoselim found the boot camp
  • Yoselim’s volunteer work and how that factors into her life
  • Yoselim’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Yoselim knows now that she didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Yoselim
  • Yoselim’s favorite resource, product, or gadget
  • Yoselim’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Yoselim online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. Be yourself. Being different is good
  2. Everyone has something to offer.
  3. Take care of your mental health.

Yoselim Bravo’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“Be yourself. Please.”

Favorite Quotes

“I was trying really hard to be like everybody else. And I think the more I fight it, the more I notice I was super different.”  –Yoselim Bravo on what she knows today that she didn’t know back then

“My favorite book is Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell  –Yoselim Bravo on the book that changed everything

“I cannot live without EdX.” –Yoselim Bravo on her favorite resource or gadget

“I think it’s waking up early, and my to-do list.” –Yoselim Bravo on her best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Yoselim Bravo

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32011
The Value of Partnership with James Garrett https://youngarchitect.com/the-value-of-partnership-with-james-garrett/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-value-of-partnership-with-james-garrett Mon, 09 Nov 2020 18:46:02 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31917 James Garrett

James Garrett knew that he was interested in building early on. He loved playing with Legos and building things as a child, and he always had an interest in tall buildings. He describes himself as an urbanist because of his interest in tall buildings and how they made cities recognizable by their skylines. When James’s family took a trip to Chicago, he made a point of drawing all of the famous buildings. 

Neither of James’s parents were in architecture, but his grandfather’s godfather was the city architect in St. Paul – one of the first black municipal architects in the United States. That family history and influence also helped to inspire James in his path to becoming an architect. 

In today’s episode, James talks about his school experience and what happened for him after school. He talks about taking a trip to South Africa and shares how his father’s passing affected him. He explains how he decided to go into business for himself, how his first business failed, and how he met his business partners. He also discusses progress in the field of architecture – both the progress that he’s seen himself over the years and progress that he’d like to see in the future. 

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  • What inspired James to go into architecture
  • Family influences that helped to inspire James
  • What school was like for James
  • What happened for James after architecture school was over
  • How James’s father’s passing affected him
  • How James found his business partners
  • James’s advice for people who want to start their own businesses
  • The benefit of having partners that think differently from you
  • Progress that James has seen for minorities in architecture
  • Progress that James would like to see in the field
  • Projects James has coming up in the future
  • James’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What James knows now that he didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for James
  • James’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find James online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. Build your resiliency and don’t give up
  2. Use your years as a student to explore new ideas
  3. Never assume that you’re done learning

James Garrett’s Advice for Aspiring Architects 

“My advice for aspiring architects would start with don’t give up. It would start with fight on. It would begin with taking an approach to resiliency and sort of intestinal fortitude, building those things up and really committing to move forward and to be open to exploring different ideas and really using your time in school as a laboratory to test out different theories, to test out different things and areas that you’re curious about.”

Favorite Quotes

“I think the main thing that I know at this point is that there is so much more I need to learn.”  –James Garrett on what he knows today that he didn’t know back then

“Most recently, there’s a book that really has changed the way I think about a lot of things by a professor named Dr. Stephanie Kelton, it’s called Deficit Myth.” –James Garrett on the book that changed everything

“I have a lot of timesaving tricks but then I do a lot of things that contradict that too, and so I don’t think I actually save any time.” –James Garrett on his best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

James Garrett on Instagram
4RM+ULA
4RM+ULA on Instagram

 

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31917
Reimagining Urban Living with Gregory Minott https://youngarchitect.com/reimagining-urban-living-with-gregory-minott/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=reimagining-urban-living-with-gregory-minott Fri, 06 Nov 2020 21:03:31 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31892 Gregory Minott

Gregory Minott

Gregory Minott says that he didn’t really know what an architect was or what they did when he was growing up. However, he did have a lot of experiences and influences that pointed him in the direction of architecture as a career.

In the area of Jamaica where Greg grew up, there were frequently new homes being constructed, and one of the things that he liked to do as a child was to explore the construction sites, watch the homes being built, and imagine what they’d look like when they were completed. Gregory enjoyed subjects like art, math, physics, and business while he was in school. His father was a chemical engineer, and his mother was a real estate broker. He would sometimes accompany his mother to visit real estate that she was selling, which increased his interest in building and designing. 

Eventually, Gregory’s father gave him a book of potential careers and told him that it was time to start thinking about what he wanted to do for the rest of his life. Greg landed on architecture. So, after finishing high school, Greg went to Kingston to study at the Caribbean school of architecture. 

In today’s episode, Greg talks about what he did when he finished school, why he decided to move to the US for his master’s degree, and what the licensing process was like for him. He also explains how he decided that it was time to start his own firm and what kinds of projects he was interested in working on. 

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  •  Gregory’s childhood
  • The experiences and influences that led Gregory to architecture school
  • What happened for Gregory after architecture school
  • How Gregory decided to leave Jamaica to move to Newark to get his masters
  • Gregory’s introduction to the US
  • How Gregory started his own firm
  • What Gregory’s early projects looked like
  • What getting licensed was like for Gregory
  • Gregory’s feelings about entrepreneurship
  • How Gregory’s firm is involved in development
  • Gregory’s experience rising through the ranks of architecture as a black man in the US
  • Gregory’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Gregory knows now that he didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Gregory
  • Gregory’s favorite gadget
  • Gregory’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Gregory online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. We are all a collection of our experiences and influences.
  2. Look for ways to solve the problems that you care about.
  3. Don’t take your professional relationships for granted.

Gregory Minott’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“I’d say, just be yourself.”

Favorite Quotes

“I didn’t realize how much relationships mattered back then.”  –Gregory Minott on what he knows today that he didn’t know back then

The Dream Giver by Bruce Wilkinson.” –Gregory Minott on the book that changed everything

“I like Pinterest because it’s cook, it’s just an easy way to get juices flowing on a project.” –Gregory Minott on his favorite resource, product, or gadget.”

“Bullet points, for me.” –Gregory Minott on his best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Gregory Minott
GMinott@DreamCollaborative.com 
Dream Collaborative
Dream Collaborative on LinkedIn
Dream Collaborative on Instagram

 

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31892
The Effects of Culture and Community on Architecture with Marsha McDonald https://youngarchitect.com/the-effects-of-culture-and-community-on-architecture-with-marsha-mcdonald/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-effects-of-culture-and-community-on-architecture-with-marsha-mcdonald Mon, 02 Nov 2020 16:30:37 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31887 Marsha McDonald

Marsha McDonald decided to pursue a career in architecture at the age of 13. When she was in school in Jamaica, students were required to decide on certain subjects to pursue in high school based on the careers they wanted. Marsha took a career assessment test, and architecture was one of the two professions that she scored highest in. It also touched on a lot of subjects that she had interest in, so she decided that was the career to pursue. 

Marsha attended the Caribbean School of Architecture in Jamaica and earned a bachelor’s degree. She came to the US to pursue her M. Arch, but didn’t do so right away. She spent some time working in construction and in interior design, got married, and had children. Then she enrolled in Florida International University and returned to her pursuit of a career in architecture. 

At FIU, Marsha has also done a lot of research into community and culture in architecture, with a focus on Latin American and the Caribbean culture, urban spaces and sustainable design. In today’s podcast episode, she talks about the takeaways from that research, her own work in communities, and how to set young people up for success in the architecture field. 

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  • What inspired Marsha to go into architecture
  • Marsha’s architecture school experience
  • Marsha’s experience as one of only a few black architecture students
  • The takeaways from Marsha’s research at FIU
  • Marsha’s involvement in her community and other communities
  • Projects that Marsha has done with children and young people
  • How Marsha juggles parenting and architecture
  • Marsha’s architecture conference
  • What Marsha thinks could be done better to set young people up for success
  • Marsha’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Marsha knows now that she didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Marsha
  • Marsha’s favorite resource, product, or gadget
  • Marsha’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Marsha online

 Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. It’s never to early to map out your career path
  2. Project management tools can help you with overall time management
  3. Have confidence that you belong in the spaces you want to be in

Marsha McDonald’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“If architecture is the goal, then map out as much as you can from early.”

Favorite Quotes

“I am more confident in myself.”  –Marsha McDonald on what he knows today that he didn’t know back then

“Really, I read this book by Glen Murcutt, who is an Australian Architect, one of my faves.”  –Marsha McDonald on the book that changed everything

“I’ve really started getting into software and using software and project management softwares.”  –Marsha McDonald on her favorite resource or gadget

“Believe it or not, I have these, I call it like these pockets of activity, and I would arrange what I can get done in 15-minute pockets, 30-minute pockets, and an hour pocket.”  –Marsha McDonald on her best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Marsha McDonald on Facebook
Call Your Designer

 

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31887
Madame Architect with Julia Gamolina https://youngarchitect.com/madame-architect-with-julia-gamolina/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=madame-architect-with-julia-gamolina Thu, 22 Oct 2020 16:43:18 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31878 Julia Gamolina


When Julia Gamolina thinks about how she decided to become an architect, she thinks of the big moves that she made during her childhood. Julia was born in Russia. At 8 years old, she moved to Toronto, Canada. Then, as a teenager, she moved with her family to Colorado. This gave Julia the chance to see the urban setting in several very different contexts. 

Like many future architects, Julia also enjoyed drawing from a young age, but she posits that she was too “type A” to enjoy a career as an artist. Architecture was a natural fit, so Julia enrolled in the B. Arch program at Cornell. 

In today’s episode, Julia discusses her career trajectory and talks about how she came to create Madame Architect, a platform that highlights and celebrates women in architecture from a number of different backgrounds. She talks about the challenges of content creation and some of her plans for the future.

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  •  Julia’s childhood
  • The experiences and influences that led Julia to architecture school
  • Where Julia attended architecture school
  • What happened for Julia after architecture school
  • Where Madame Architect came from 
  • Julia’s plans for Madame Architect
  • Julia’s writing process
  • Julia’s advice for someone who may want to create an architecture blog
  • How Julia finds readers
  • What’s going on at Trahan Architects
  • Julia’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Julia knows now that she didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Julia
  • Julia’s favorite gadget
  • Julia’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Julia online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. Seeing architecture in different contexts lends new perspective.
  2. Staying consistent and always following through are vital qualities.
  3. There’s no one path or perfect formula for success.

Julia Gamolina’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“Consistency, repetition, and follow-through are really key.”

Favorite Quotes

 “There is just no secret, there is no formula.”  –Julia Gamolina on what she knows today that she didn’t know back then

“It’s called The Corner Office by Adam Bryant.” –Julia Gamolina on the book that changed everything

“I just got a metronome that will pace me while I play and practice.” –Julia Gamolina on her favorite resource, product, or gadget.”

“Oh my God, my planner.” –Julia Gamolina on her best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Julia Gamolina
Madame Architect
Julia on Instagram
Madame Architect on Instagram

 

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31878
Building Without Burnout with Saadiah Angster https://youngarchitect.com/building-without-burnout-with-saadiah-angster/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=building-without-burnout-with-saadiah-angster Fri, 16 Oct 2020 16:49:38 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31873 Saadiah Angster

When he was younger, Saadiah Angster thought that he wanted to be an astronaut. However, his sister felt that he was too creative to do well as an astronaut and that architecture would be a better fit for his personality and his talents. So, she pitched the idea and introduced Saadiah to some of what an architectural career would entail. 

In today’s interview, Saadiah talks about his college experience and what happened for him after college, including his internships and why he bounced around from job to job for a while. 

Saadiah also talks about the subject of burnout. He shares an experience that he had with a serious case of burnout and why he didn’t prioritize taking breaks at the time to avoid it. He discusses the importance of taking breaks when necessary to help avoid exhaustion and burnout. 

Saadiah also discusses his impressions of the Young Architect Summer Series, his new podcast, and what he wants to do next. Listen in to learn more about Saadiah and his journey as an architect. 

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  • What inspired Saadiah to pursue a career in architecture
  • Where Saadiah completed architecture school
  • What happened for Saadiah after architecture school
  • The importance of taking breaks to avoid burnout
  • What happened after Saadiah realized that he was burned out
  • What Saadiah wants to do next
  • Saadiah’s thoughts on the Young Architect Summer Series
  • Saadiah’s new podcast
  • Saadiah’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Saadiah knows now that he didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Saadiah
  • Saadiah’s favorite gadget
  • Saadiah’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Saadiah online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. Architecture is a bigger field than you think
  2. Taking breaks when needed can help avoid bigger interruptions due to burnout.
  3. Architecture is ultimately a business. 

Saadiah Angster’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“If you want to do it for the passion, don’t stop. If you want to do it for the money, find a way. And if you’re listening to this to find some more advice and insight, the best thing for you to do is start thinking for yourself and seeing where that takes you.”

Favorite Quotes

“I definitely learned it’s definitely a business.”  –Saadiah Angster on what he knows today that he didn’t know back then

“Harry Potter got me to start reading.” –Saadiah Angster on the book that changed everything

“It’s a little steel bottle opener, and I’ve used this thing for so many times. It’s like the best gadget ever.” –Saadiah Angster on his favorite resource, product, or gadget.”

“Time is of the essence, time always exists. Don’t ever think it doesn’t. It is always there.” –Saadiah Angster on his best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Saadiah Angster
Saadiah on Facebook
Saadiah’s Podcast

 

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31873
NCARB By Their Stakeholders – ARE Problems & NCARB Satisfaction https://youngarchitect.com/ncarbsurvey2020/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ncarbsurvey2020 Mon, 12 Oct 2020 21:40:18 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31839

The Survey – A Snapshot in Time 

With the ARE 5.1 timeline moving very quickly, myself and a small group of concerned ARE Candidates felt it was important to capture a snapshot in time, by surveying ARE Candidates and NCARB’s Stakeholders in early October 2020.

 We were interested in finding out:

1. How bad the ARE 5.0 software problems really are. Before all the new technology changes get implemented. 

2. How do people generally feel about their relationship with NCARB? This year and in general.

3. What are their opinions on many of the new changes?

The survey was completed by 1,114 ARE Candidates and NCARB Stakeholders, between Sep 30th – Oct 10th, 2020. We asked 16 powerful questions. 

Being Anti-NCARB 

I want to make it clear that no one who worked on this survey believes that NCARB should be eliminated or abolished. It’s safe to say, we all believe in NCARB’s Mission and Values, we also believe working with NCARB shouldn’t be so adversarial. Which is why the survey was created.

Below I share the questions and answers, with a short explanation about why each question was asked. Thank you to everyone who completed, shared and participated in this survey.

NCARB By Their Stakeholders – ARE Problems & NCARB Satisfaction

Where are you currently at in your ARE Timeline?

  • 88% I have at least taken one of the ARE Divisions (pass or fail)
  • 12% I have completed all the ARE Divisions

Why this question?

We wanted people who have at least taken 1 exam (pass or fail) or completed the ARE to fill out this survey. We requested anyone who has not taken any exams, to not complete this survey. 

Did you experience software issues while taking the ARE?

  • 73% – Yes
  • 27% – No

Why this question?

We knew the ARE 5.0 software problems inside the testing center was high, however this percentage is much higher than what we predicted it would be. 

While taking the ARE, have you experienced any of the following? 

  • 49% Error messages while testing at a test facility
  • 77% Lagging issues, resulting in overall test time being limited
  • 17% Test crashes that resulted in having to take the test over
  • Hundreds of other issues were reported, not listed in this selection.

The people who reported software issues, were allowed to choose multiple options

Why this question?

We listed the most commonly reported issues we kept hearing in the Community and gave the option of Other for everything that wasn’t covered. 

Do you feel NCARB has adequately addressed the ARE testing issues you experienced? 

  • 94% No, NCARB has not addressed these issues
  • 6% Yes, I feel NCARB listened and corrected the issues I experienced

People who did not report testing issues were not included in these percentages.

Why these questions??

It’s been 4 years of reporting the same problems over and over again to NCARB. They claimed to have fixed many of these problems or they have repeatedly blamed Prometric. 

Prometric’s Testing Proctors have repeatedly told ARE Candidates that they experience more problems with NCARB’s testing software, then any other exam Prometric administers.

During ARE testing, have you ever restricted your use of one of the test features (strike out, highlighter, calculator, mark for review) in an effort to make sure the test did not crash?

  • 53% No, I have not
  • 47% Yes, I have

Why this question?

Many have reported the software issues are linked to the features that facilitate testing within The ARE’s testing software. People try to highlight a piece of the question or strike out the wrong answer, use the calculator, or mark a question for review and it causes the computer to crash. 

Candidates commonly used the scratch paper to write down the question numbers they wanted to come back to because, if the computer crashes they will lose all the marked answers. In ARE 5.1 NCARB has doubled down with creating more features to facilitate testing by replacing scratch paper with “a digital white board software”, invented by NCARB. 

As a result of the upcoming ARE changes slated for Nov. 16th, 2020 have you modified your testing schedule?

  • 33% Yes, I have moved my exam timeline up
  • 31% I would change the exam timeline if it were possible, but I cannot schedule a seat prior to Nov. 16th
  • 36% No, These changes have not made me change my testing schedule
  • People who have completed all the exams were not factored into these percentages

Why this question?

From previous bad experiences with NCARB and their software, many Candidates want to test before the new ARE 5.1 takes effect. Unfortunately NCARB has decided to push such a rapid rollout, leaving most Candidates little time to adjust their testing strategy and schedule exams. 

There are many people who had already scheduled exams in late November, before these changes were announced. They will now be impacted by policy changes that did not exist before they paid and scheduled those exams. 

Was NCARB's response during COVID-19 in the ARE Candidates best interest?

  • 81% NCARB dropped the ball. They should have made sure NCARB was included in Prometric’s Essential Client Program. 
  • 19% NCARB's response to COVID was adequate.
  • People who completed their exams prior to this time were not factored into these percentages

Why this question?

At the beginning of the COVID shutdown there was tons of miscommunication between what NCARB and Prometric both telling Candidates conflicting stories. 

When testing was finally restarted, NCARB failed to work with Prometric to be added to their “Prometric Essential Client Program”, resulting in all ARE Candidates losing their test dates to other professions, who did join Prometric’s program. 

I personally made a video explaining this situation as it was happening. NCARB FAILS at Handling COVID-19 

Do you think the way the ARE is written could give native English speakers an unfair advantage? 

  • 50% Yes
  • 36% Maybe
  • 14% No

Why this question?

The English as a Second Language community is starting to get more vocal in speaking out about systemic barriers with ARE testing and how poorly written many of the ARE exam questions can be.  Many native english speakers have struggled to understand what NCARB is asking for on the exam. 

Many feel that the ESL Community has not been properly acknowledged in a conversation about systemic barriers within architecture licensing. 

Do you believe remote proctoring is a different experience than testing at a testing facility?

  • 94% Yes, I believe these two test scenarios are overall different experiences
  • 6% No, these two test scenarios are the same experience

Why this question?

When NCARB announced the removal of the scratch paper, their justification was that testing with remote proctoring and at a testing center needed to be “the same experience”. 

A Remote Proctor would have no ability to take away scratch paper at the end of the exam, so they eliminated it. 

If remote proctored exams could not use scratch paper, neither can anyone inside a testing center. 

The argument immediately erupted that testing with “remote proctoring” or “inside a testing center” is a fundamentally different experience. They are each subject to a very different set of rules to take each test. 

Many people have asked, Why is NCARB eliminating scratch paper from the people who are NOT using the remote proctoring? 

Do you believe that not having access to physical scratch paper will affect ARE Candidate’s test performance?

  • 94% Yes
  • 5% Maybe
  • 1% No 

Why this question?

The community exploded when NCARB announced scratch paper will be removed and replaced with a new “digital white board” software that is now being developed by NCARB.  

ARE Candidates claim they have been trained to solve problems by writing on a piece of paper. Many people use the scratch paper to circumnavigate the software problems with the calculator or the mark for review function. 

This controversial announcement was made weeks before the development of the digital white board software would be complete. Leaving NCARB with an inability to properly explain, or model how it works and giving people little time to learn how to use it.  

Do you feel the removal of scratch paper could affect a Candidate's test performance due to physical disability or Left-handedness? 

  • 82% Yes, NCARB has not taken these issues into account
  • 16% Not sure
  • 2% No, This should not affect any test candidate's test performance

Why this question?

ARE testing with Prometric’s tools are already designed for right handed people with the inability to configure the mouse and keyboard for Left handed Candidates. Lefty’s are already struggling and currently working with right handed tools to take the ARE. 

Sketching during the exam, with a mouse on a “digital white board” for a Lefty will be significantly more difficult, than just using the mouse to click the correct answer. 

Do you feel the Nov. 16th, 2020 changes to the ARE will help with testing or are they just more roadblocks to licensure? 

  • 84% More roadblocks
  • 4% These changes will help
  • 12% Not Sure

Why this question?

Self explanatory.

During 2020, what is your overall satisfaction with NCARB?

  • 47%  – Dissatisfied with NCARB
  • 25%  – No confidence in NCARB
  • 23%  – Neutral
  • 4%  – Moderately satisfied with NCARB
  • 1%  – Extremely satisfied with NCARB

Summary
72% Dissatisfied
23% Neutral
5% Satisfied

Starting from the beginning of your relationship with NCARB what is your overall satisfaction with NCARB?

  • 41%  – Dissatisfied with NCARB
  • 18%  – No confidence in NCARB
  • 31%  – Neutral
  • 9%  – Moderately satisfied with NCARB
  • 1%  – Extremely satisfied with NCARB

Summary
59% Dissatisfied
30% Neutral
11% Satisfied

Why this question?

We wanted to capture how 1,114 of NCARB’s Stakeholders really felt about NCARB and how their opinion has changed during 2020. 

After all of the past years shortcomings, changes, and issues with the ARE, Do you think NCARB CEO Michael J. Armstrong should step down?

  • 49% – Not Sure
  • 48% – Yes
  • 3% – No 

Why this question?

Many people have been calling for NCARB’s CEO Michael Armstrong to resign. He has recently been scrutinized for several different issues. There are always 2 sides to every story. We have not personally investigated all the issues, but we still felt this was in important question to ask. 

Do you feel the NCARB Board of Directors properly understands the concerns, challenges, and issues facing ARE candidates? 

  • 95% – No, I feel there is a large disconnect between the board and the ARE candidates.
  • 5% – Yes, I feel they have a good understanding.

Why this question?

In the wake of a larger conversation about diversity, many people have questioned if NCARB’s Board of Directors accurately represents and understands the diverse and changing needs of their Stakeholders.

Do you feel that ARE Candidates are being properly represented when decisions around testing are being made by NCARB?

  • 93% – No
  • 4% – Not Sure
  • 3% – Yes

Why this question?

When ARE 5.1 started rolling out on an accelerated schedule many people started questioning who is advocating on behalf of NCARB’s Stakeholders with any of these decisions.  

 

In the past year, do you feel that NCARB has appropriately communicated with you in regards to changes in the ARE exams?

  • 75% – No
  • 25% – Yes
  • People who completed their exams prior to this time were not factored into these percentages

Why this question?

Many people have repeatedly stated they are frustrated with what they believe is poor and careless communication. 

Survey Conclusion

The purpose of this survey was to capture an unfiltered snapshot in time of how the NCARB Stakeholders are feeling before the rollout of ARE 5.1. 

I personally hear from many frustrated ARE Candidates every single day. ITS EXHAUSTING! I will continue to encourage these people to redirect their NCARB frustrations into outreach for positive change with their AIA Leaders and State Boards. 

The mission of Young Architect is helping the NEXT generation of Architects succeed. As saddened as I am by this survey's results, I’m grateful to have the opportunity to have this platform to elevate the voices of the NCARB Stakeholders with a shared goal of positive change. 

-Michael Riscica and the NCARB Survey Committee

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Giving Back Through Mentorship with Bill Martin https://youngarchitect.com/giving-back-through-mentorship-with-bill-martin/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=giving-back-through-mentorship-with-bill-martin Mon, 12 Oct 2020 17:39:02 +0000 https://youngarchitect.com/?p=31836 Bill Martin

Bill Martin can remember precisely when he first felt an interest in architecture. He was six years old, and his father had decided to do some home renovation – namely, removing an archway located between the home’s living room and dining room. 

What Bill’s father didn’t realize was that the archway was holding up the ceiling joist. Removing the archway caused movement in the ceiling. At the time, Bill was fascinated by the way that a seemingly simple change in the home’s structure could cause unexpected effects. Bill’s father reinforced the ceiling joist, and Bill’s interest in architecture was born. 

In today’s interview, Bill discusses some of the things that he’s learned during his journey to becoming a practicing architect. He talks about his interest in sustainable architecture, why he believes it’s important to get licensed early, and what it’s like to run his own architecture practice. He also discusses the importance of mentorship and why he feels compelled to be a mentor for young architects.

What You’ll Hear on This Episode  

  • What inspired Bill to pursue architecture
  • Where Bill went to architecture school
  • What happened after Bill finished architecture school
  • How long Bill has had his own practice
  • Some of the early projects that Bill worked on
  • How Bill’s passion for sustainability has influenced his practice
  • The sustainable principle that Bill implements in his current projects
  • How Bill got involved in politics
  • How mentorship has factored into Bill’s career
  • Whether Bill’s practice has always been a one-man shop
  • Bill’s discussion with AI New Jersey
  • Bill’s advice for aspiring architects
  • What Bill knows now that he didn’t know then
  • The book that changed everything for Bill
  • Bill’s favorite gadget
  • Bill’s best timesaving trick
  • Where listeners can find Bill online

Top 3 Takeaways from This Episode

  1. Be the mentor that a younger architect needs.
  2. Don’t let others tell you what you can’t do.
  3. If you work for yourself, be relentless when it comes to getting paid.

Bill Martin’s Advice for Aspiring Architects

“Never let anyone tell you that you can’t do something.”

Favorite Quotes

“I did not realize how hard it is to get paid by clients.” –Bill Martin on what he knows today that he didn’t know back then

“My favorite one, and it’s still my favorite one is one from my childhood – it’s Harold and the Purple Crayon.” Bill Martin on the book that changed everything

“It’s really my pen. My Pilot Precise B7 rolling ball pen.” –Bill Martin on the resource he can’t live without.

“You have to be careful, because if you save too much time in that process, you may not have as good a design in the end as you would otherwise.” –Bill Martin on his best timesaving trick.

Resources Mentioned in the Show:

Bill Martin
Bill on Twitter

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